Use Visual Studio Code for your Particle development needs


#41

Hello, @gusgonnet
Thank you for the nice instruction.
I followed everything in the tutorial and was able to compile by pressing ctrl+shift+b however it does not proceed to flash the firmware.bin to the board.
I cannot select “flash” per this instruction.

Ctrl+P, then entering task and space, then selecting flash from the list

Following is the output from the terminal when I press ctrl+shift+B

running command> particle compile electron D:\Particle_WS --saveTo D:\Particle_WS/firmware.bin

Compiling code for electron

Including:
blink.ino
attempting to compile firmware
downloading binary from: /v1/binaries/5c780131c6c1a910e76a321c
saving to: D:\Particle_WS/firmware.bin
Memory use:
text data bss dec hex filename
4380 116 1492 5988 1764 /workspace/target/workspace.elf

Compile succeeded.
Saved firmware to: D:\Particle_WS\firmware.bin


#42

glad you like it! what I see there potentially wrong is the / instead of the \ before the word firmware

could it be?


#43

Just for the records: I don’t quite know how @gusgonnet’s setup compares to it but there is the officially supported Particle Workbench that’s also based on VS Code but probably provides some extra stuff.

Gustavo deserves all credit for bringing this out before Particle - great job :+1: and this should not diminishing his efforts in any way.

However Workbench provides auto downloading of device OS firmware and toolchain for all platforms and multiple versions, platform switching, library management, debugging and intellisense are a bit more mature on the official version.
It’s available as offical extension in VS Code without the need for any leg work on your side :wink:


#44

thank you and that is correct!

You can get the Particle Workbench here:


#45

2019 UPDATE
Particle released Particle Workbench, which runs on top of VS Code.
It is much better than what I described in this tutorial few years ago, so I’d suggest you use it instead!
Here’s the announcement.

Cheers,
Gustavo.