Homebridge troubleshooting

Two days ago, I posted a message here: HomeKit update, non-commercial version - SRP

I got an off-line reaction suggesting me to start a new thread as it will help more people of this community struggling with the same issues…

There we are:


Now that my dozen Particles around the new home are maturing in their tasks and working together as a band, I am turning to find appropriate tools and platforms to monitor and control them in an elegant and practical way.
I’d like to compare two candidates: Apple Homekit and OpenHAB.

Right now, as I’m an “Apple boy”, I believe “Homebridge”, as a bridge to Apple Homekit looks like a promising road.

I’m not a programmer and not experienced with Linux/Unix …
So, I took took a deep breath and ordered the brandnew “Pi3 B+”…

In one long day, I have …

  • assembled my brandnew Pi with a SmartiPi touchscreen,
  • set-up the Pi from scratch,
  • learned to “speak” Linux :wink: ssh and VNC my Pi from my Mac and
  • managed to set it’s resolution to such an incredibly small size (try “pixel doubling” on a touchscreen!) that I could’nt configure it anymore… and I
  • escaped finally! (With a little help from great Linux minds!)
  • set-up Particle Pi where I
  • managed the little green “D7” led using my iPhone App. Then I
  • started installing Homebridge by following the original Github instructions by nfarina which Jordy (@Moors7 ) mentioned in the previous post.
    https://github.com/nfarina/homebridge

I am very happy I managed to install Homebridge that far already without any help, but now I’m afraid to be STUCK!

It would be great if someone, experienced with Homebridge, could give me a few tips how I could proceed?
I 'd really like to make it work!

These are the last steps I took a few minutes ago:


All went well with trial & error…
Fnally I also managed to create a required “homebridge” folder and ditto system user using “sudo” as my authorization wasn’t right…
However, I couldn’t check if this user can write to that directory.

All seemed to go well until I did this (From NFARINA 's Github procedure):

* Then Enable and run the service (first time) with the following commands:

systemctl daemon-reload
systemctl enable homebridge
systemctl start homebridge

What happened on the Pi’s terminal screen?

pi@raspberrypi:/var/lib/homebridge $ systemctl daemon-reload

=> OK, seems fine…

pi@raspberrypi:/var/lib/homebridge $ systemctl enable homebridge
Failed to enable unit: File homebridge.service: No such file or directory

=> ERROR! ???

When I check the homebridge directory and “config.json” file, they both exist:

pi@raspberrypi:/var/lib/homebridge $ ls
config.json

Checking the homebridge status:

pi@raspberrypi:/var/lib/homebridge $ systemctl status homebridge
Unit homebridge.service could not be found.

=> STUCK!

Happy Easter
:wave::older_man:

Hi @FiDel
So far it looks good, it seems like Linux doesn’t bother being approachable fine with being a very sharp tool at the hands of a skilled operator. Most likely one of two things: permissions- like asking for a variable outside the function that created it, or an exact directory change- the instructions aren’t as clear as they could be. Every user only has the exact amount of permission to do what they want. SSH is text based adventure time!

ls -la

is your friend, ls lists the files/folders the -la is the argument that lists permissions and hidden files like folders that start with a dot like .homebridge. The man gives you the manual on anything man ls a fascinating read :roll_eyes:

Start with the command:

which homebridge

Which it should come back with the directory which it was installed the Homebridge. The wiki in the Pi section has an installation guide listed under ‘Running Homebridge on Bootup (systemd)’ that lists the steps.

Where are your startup scripts? From the main guide they are in /etc/default and /etc/systemd/system next stop is investigating those.

cd /etc/systemd/system
ls

should contain homebridge.service then see the contents of that file by sudo nano homebridge.service and the line beginning with ExecStart= this should be targeting to the same directory path as the which homebridge told you. Start here, the next thing is permissions.

3 Likes

OK @makerken thanks for your reply!
I checked these points:

List all files:

pi@raspberrypi:~ $ ls -la
total 156
drwxr-xr-x 29 pi   pi   4096 Mar 30 00:28 .
drwxr-xr-x  3 root root 4096 Mar 13 22:55 ..
-rw-------  1 pi   pi   2679 Mar 31 18:11 .bash_history
-rw-r--r--  1 pi   pi    220 Mar 13 22:55 .bash_logout
-rw-r--r--  1 pi   pi   3523 Mar 13 22:55 .bashrc
drwxr-xr-x  7 pi   pi   4096 Mar 28 23:43 .cache
drwx------  8 pi   pi   4096 Mar 28 23:06 .claws-mail
drwx------ 18 pi   pi   4096 Mar 29 01:44 .config
drwx------  3 pi   pi   4096 Mar 14 00:23 .dbus
drwxr-xr-x  2 pi   pi   4096 Mar 30 00:10 Desktop
drwxr-xr-x  4 pi   pi   4096 Mar 28 23:47 Documents
drwxr-xr-x  2 pi   pi   4096 Mar 14 00:18 Downloads
-rw-------  1 pi   pi   4118 Mar 28 23:26 example.txt:.save
drwx------  2 pi   pi   4096 Mar 28 23:53 .gconf
drwx------  3 pi   pi   4096 Mar 28 18:01 .gnome
drwx------  3 pi   pi   4096 Mar 14 00:18 .gnupg
-rw-r--r--  1 pi   pi     80 Mar 28 21:07 .gtkrc-2.0
drwxr-xr-x  4 pi   pi   4096 Mar 29 01:44 .homebridge
drwxr-xr-x  3 pi   pi   4096 Mar 13 23:41 .local
drwxr-xr-x  2 pi   pi   4096 Mar 14 00:18 Music
drwxr-xr-x  2 pi   pi   4096 Mar 28 23:25 .nano
drwxr-xr-x  4 pi   pi   4096 Mar 29 02:00 .npm
drwxr-xr-x  2 pi   pi   4096 Mar 14 00:43 .oracle_jre_usage
drwxr-xr-x  2 pi   pi   4096 Mar 14 00:18 Pictures
drwx------  3 pi   pi   4096 Mar 14 00:47 .pki
-rw-r--r--  1 pi   pi    675 Mar 13 22:55 .profile
drwxr-xr-x  2 pi   pi   4096 Mar 14 00:18 Public
drwxr-xr-x  2 pi   pi   4096 Mar 13 23:41 python_games
drwxr-xr-x  2 pi   pi   4096 Mar 14 00:18 Templates
drwxr-xr-x  3 pi   pi   4096 Mar 14 00:18 .themes
drwx------  4 pi   pi   4096 Mar 28 18:23 .thumbnails
drwxr-xr-x  2 pi   pi   4096 Mar 14 00:18 Videos
drwx------  3 pi   pi   4096 Mar 28 20:37 .vnc
drwxr-xr-x  3 pi   pi   4096 Mar 14 00:43 .Wolfram
drwxr-xr-x 11 pi   pi   4096 Mar 14 00:43 .WolframEngine
-rw-------  1 pi   pi     56 Mar 30 00:28 .Xauthority
-rw-------  1 pi   pi   3955 Mar 30 00:28 .xsession-errors
-rw-------  1 pi   pi   3955 Mar 29 23:59 .xsession-errors.old

Where is Homebridge located?

pi@raspberrypi:~ $ which homebridge
/usr/bin/homebridge

Where are your startup scripts located?

  1. Check /etc/systemd/system directory:
pi@raspberrypi:~ $ cd /etc/systemd/system
pi@raspberrypi:/etc/systemd/system $ ls -la
total 72
drwxr-xr-x 17 root root 4096 Mar 14 00:27 .
drwxr-xr-x  5 root root 4096 Mar 13 22:43 ..
-rw-r--r--  1 root root 1551 Jul  4  2017 autologin@.service
drwxr-xr-x  2 root root 4096 Mar 13 23:05 bluetooth.target.wants
lrwxrwxrwx  1 root root   37 Mar 13 23:05 dbus-org.bluez.service -> /lib/systemd/system/bluetooth.service
lrwxrwxrwx  1 root root   40 Mar 13 23:07 dbus-org.freedesktop.Avahi.service -> /lib/systemd/system/avahi-daemon.service
lrwxrwxrwx  1 root root   34 Mar 13 23:08 dhcpcd5.service -> /lib/systemd/system/dhcpcd.service
drwxr-xr-x  2 root root 4096 Mar 13 23:19 dhcpcd.service.d
lrwxrwxrwx  1 root root   35 Mar 13 23:16 display-manager.service -> /lib/systemd/system/lightdm.service
drwxr-xr-x  2 root root 4096 Mar 13 23:41 getty.target.wants
drwxr-xr-x  2 root root 4096 Mar 13 22:55 getty@tty1.service.d
drwxr-xr-x  2 root root 4096 Mar 13 23:01 halt.target.wants
drwxr-xr-x  2 root root 4096 Mar 14 00:27 multi-user.target.wants
drwxr-xr-x  2 root root 4096 Mar 13 22:50 network-online.target.wants
drwxr-xr-x  2 root root 4096 Mar 14 00:27 pigpiod.service.d
drwxr-xr-x  2 root root 4096 Mar 13 23:01 poweroff.target.wants
drwxr-xr-x  2 root root 4096 Mar 13 23:07 rc-local.service.d
drwxr-xr-x  2 root root 4096 Mar 13 23:01 reboot.target.wants
drwxr-xr-x  2 root root 4096 Mar 13 23:06 remote-fs.target.wants
drwxr-xr-x  2 root root 4096 Mar 13 23:08 sockets.target.wants
drwxr-xr-x  2 root root 4096 Mar 13 23:04 sysinit.target.wants
lrwxrwxrwx  1 root root   35 Mar 13 22:49 syslog.service -> /lib/systemd/system/rsyslog.service
drwxr-xr-x  2 root root 4096 Mar 13 22:50 timers.target.wants
pi@raspberrypi:/etc/systemd/system $ 

  1. Check /etc/default directory:
pi@raspberrypi:/etc/systemd/system $ cd /etc/default
pi@raspberrypi:/etc/default $ ls -la
total 92
drwxr-xr-x   2 root root 4096 Mar 29 23:58 .
drwxr-xr-x 111 root root 4096 Mar 30 00:10 ..
-rw-r--r--   1 root root  219 Jan 23  2017 avahi-daemon
-rw-r--r--   1 root root  845 Oct 24  2016 bluetooth
-rw-r--r--   1 root root  222 Oct 25  2016 bsdmainutils
-rw-r--r--   1 root root  276 Mar 13 23:07 console-setup
-rw-r--r--   1 root root  549 Aug 23  2014 crda
-rw-r--r--   1 root root  955 Oct  7 15:38 cron
-rw-r--r--   1 root root  297 Mar  2 09:59 dbus
-rw-r--r--   1 root root   84 Mar  5  2012 fake-hwclock
-rw-r--r--   1 root root  657 Mar  7 19:29 hwclock
-rw-r--r--   1 root root  150 Mar 29 23:58 keyboard
-rw-r--r--   1 root root   52 Mar 13 22:52 locale
-rw-r--r--   1 root root  306 Jun  2  2015 networking
-rw-r--r--   1 root root  793 Dec 15  2016 nfs-common
-rw-r--r--   1 root root 1756 Jan 14 11:39 nss
-rw-r--r--   1 root root  292 Mar 13 22:05 raspberrypi-kernel
-rw-r--r--   1 root root 2062 Dec 10 13:57 rsync
-rw-r--r--   1 root root  124 Jan 18  2017 rsyslog
-rw-r--r--   1 root root  133 Mar  1 13:36 ssh
-rw-r--r--   1 root root  625 Aug  3  2016 timidity
-rw-r--r--   1 root root  548 Aug 30  2016 triggerhappy
-rw-r--r--   1 root root 1118 Mar 13 23:07 useradd
pi@raspberrypi:/etc/default $ 

Conclusion: none of these directories contains “homebridge.service”…

I’ll be quick after today. It’s looking for scrips to tell it what the service should be but isn’t finding them, there is a link to ‘gists’ that have the contents of the files/scripts you need to make. Take a look at that the guide linked, but I’ll make you more detailed instructions.

Very recommended, at least when I took it a few years back, interactive and free:

1 Like

OK, tks @makerken!
Now the whole family is here, so I’ll come back tomorrow…
Happy Easter!
:bell:

Now that I read it again, I don’t have anything to add to the guide linked in the Homebridge wiki, also linked above. Follow all those steps, also the note to step 2 “I had to remove local from: ExecStart=/usr/local/bin/homebridge $HOMEBRIDGE_OPTS because my homebridge installed in /usr/bin/” as your installation is there too, as shown from which homebridge

Step 1 the gist reads:
# The following settings tells homebridge where to find the config.json file and where to persist the data (i.e. pairing and others) HOMEBRIDGE_OPTS=-U /var/homebridge
but your config.json file was in /var/lib/homebridge so update it to the correct directory.

Related you might get an not exists error on step 5 and 6, but it won’t hurt anything.
Step 7: sudo chmod -R 0777 /var/homebridge will change to sudo chmod -R 0777 /var/lib/homebridge for your installation.

Let us know how it goes.

1 Like

OK @makerken, I tried to digest it all…
As I’m not experienced with these unix ways, I had to learn what a “gist” etc… is!
I paste the complete procedure as I understand it below.
There were a few more lines where I changed “/var/homebridge” to “/var/lib/homebridge”…

I tried it step by step and commented below what happened:


Create a new file in the homebridge directory:

sudo nano /etc/default/homebridge

:white_check_mark: OK, done!

and paste this gist in that file:

# Defaults / Configuration options for homebridge
# The following settings tells homebridge where to find the config.json file and where to persist the data (i.e. pairing and others)
HOMEBRIDGE_OPTS=-U /var/lib/homebridge

# If you uncomment the following line, homebridge will log more 
# You can display this via systemd's journalctl: journalctl -f -u homebridge
# DEBUG=*

:white_check_mark: OK, done!

Then edit a file “homebridge.service” in the “/etc/systemd/system/” directory:

sudo nano /etc/systemd/system/homebridge.service

and paste this gist in that file:

[Unit]
Description=Node.js HomeKit Server 
After=syslog.target network-online.target

[Service]
Type=simple
User=homebridge
EnvironmentFile=/etc/default/homebridge
ExecStart=/usr/bin/homebridge $HOMEBRIDGE_OPTS
Restart=on-failure
RestartSec=10
KillMode=process

[Install]
WantedBy=multi-user.target

:white_check_mark: OK, done!

Note from author: I had to remove “local” from:

ExecStart=/usr/local/bin/homebridge $HOMEBRIDGE_OPTS

because my homebridge installed in /usr/bin/

Then create a user to run service:

sudo useradd --system homebridge

:computer: Response on FiDel’s screen:

useradd: user 'homebridge' already exists

Next:

sudo mkdir /var/lib/homebridge

:computer: Response on FiDel’s screen:

mkdir: cannot create directory ‘/var/lib/homebridge’: File exists

Next:

sudo cp ~/.homebridge/config.json /var/homebridge/

:computer: Response on FiDel’s screen:

cp: cannot stat '/home/pi/.homebridge/config.json': No such file or directory

=> Previous comment modified to the actual location of my “config.json” file:

sudo cp /var/lib/homebridge/config.json /var/homebridge/

:computer: Response on FiDel’s screen:

cp: cannot create regular file '/var/homebridge/': Not a directory

This copies your current user’s config.
This assumes you have already added accessories etc.

sudo cp -r ~/.homebridge/persist /var/lib/homebridge

:white_check_mark: OK, done!
(No feedback on the screen…)

sudo chmod -R 0777 /var/lib/homebridge

:white_check_mark: OK, done!
(No feedback on the screen…)

sudo systemctl daemon-reload

:white_check_mark: OK, done!
(No feedback on the screen…)

sudo systemctl enable homebridge

:white_check_mark: OK, done!
Feedback:

Created symlink /etc/systemd/system/multi-user.target.wants/homebridge.service → /etc/systemd/system/homebridge.service.

Next:

sudo systemctl start homebridge

:white_check_mark: OK, done!
(No feedback on the screen…)

Now check the status of the homebridge service:

systemctl status homebridge

:white_check_mark: OK, done!
Feedback on screen:

● homebridge.service - Node.js HomeKit Server
   Loaded: loaded (/etc/systemd/system/homebridge.service; enabled; vendor prese
   Active: active (running) since Wed 2018-04-04 23:15:51 CEST; 1min 47s ago
 Main PID: 7826 (homebridge)
   CGroup: /system.slice/homebridge.service
           └─7826 homebridge

Apr 04 23:15:56 raspberrypi homebridge[7826]:                                   
Apr 04 23:15:56 raspberrypi homebridge[7826]:                                   
Apr 04 23:15:56 raspberrypi homebridge[7826]:                                   
Apr 04 23:15:56 raspberrypi homebridge[7826]: Or enter this code with your HomeK
Apr 04 23:15:56 raspberrypi homebridge[7826]:                        
Apr 04 23:15:56 raspberrypi homebridge[7826]:     ┌────────────┐
Apr 04 23:15:56 raspberrypi homebridge[7826]:     │ 031-45-154 │
Apr 04 23:15:56 raspberrypi homebridge[7826]:     └────────────┘
Apr 04 23:15:56 raspberrypi homebridge[7826]:                        
Apr 04 23:15:56 raspberrypi homebridge[7826]: [2018-4-4 23:15:56] Homebridge is 
lines 1-17/17 (END)...skipping...
● homebridge.service - Node.js HomeKit Server
   Loaded: loaded (/etc/systemd/system/homebridge.service; enabled; vendor preset: enabled)
   Active: active (running) since Wed 2018-04-04 23:15:51 CEST; 1min 47s ago
 Main PID: 7826 (homebridge)
   CGroup: /system.slice/homebridge.service
           └─7826 homebridge

Apr 04 23:15:56 raspberrypi homebridge[7826]:                                                 
Apr 04 23:15:56 raspberrypi homebridge[7826]:                                                 
Apr 04 23:15:56 raspberrypi homebridge[7826]:                                                 
Apr 04 23:15:56 raspberrypi homebridge[7826]: Or enter this code with your HomeKit app on your
Apr 04 23:15:56 raspberrypi homebridge[7826]:                        
Apr 04 23:15:56 raspberrypi homebridge[7826]:     ┌────────────┐
Apr 04 23:15:56 raspberrypi homebridge[7826]:     │ 031-45-154 │
Apr 04 23:15:56 raspberrypi homebridge[7826]:     └────────────┘
Apr 04 23:15:56 raspberrypi homebridge[7826]:                        
Apr 04 23:15:56 raspberrypi homebridge[7826]: [2018-4-4 23:15:56] Homebridge is running on por
~
~
~
~
~
~
~
~
~
~
~
lines 1-17/17 (END)

BINGO!
The Homebridge server is running on my RPi!

:wave::older_man:

1 Like

Apologies, I guess it nice to know that the definitions of things are so embedded in me that I don’t even see then anymore. Understanding what you are doing especially when using sudo is important. When using a new installation on a raspberry pi the stakes are pretty low. If you had to Etcher the the SD card again you wouldn’t be loosing data.

I’ll give an overview of the commands used now that you’ve learned them all the hard way man <command> will document these, simplified they are:

sudo
A computer protects you from doing harmful things, putting your entire system folder in the trash, it won’t let you. In the end you own the computer so sudo lets you do anything. In this case we are adding some system files which is normally not allowed.

A gist is short, usually a single page of code

nano
Is TextEdit or notepad but using the command line so only the exact characters you type are in the file, no formatting or extras. Save a normal text document the size will be 500 bytes or 5KB, using this it would be 50 bytes. That extra space used is stuff you don’t want, system files need to be exact. Using nano your screen changes to be a text editor, and notice on the bottom lists commands, A: the shortcut Ctrl+X will exit and then ask if you want to save, yes and then asks to confirm the name of the document you just created. Saved. Then you’re back to the command line. Issue an ls command and you’ll see your newly created file.

cp
Copy. cp <originalFile> <fileToCreate> like a function you can pass an argument, recursive -R does a copy of a folder and its contents.

mkdir
Make directory, creates an empty folder. Similarly touch creates an empty file. A: the folder does not exist on a new install. If you haven’t done it yet you could check (*hint what folder would you go to and ask it to list the contents?)

~
Your home/user folder/directory. If you did cd ~ that would change the directory to you home/user folder, and then the command pwd would print working directory, showing where you were.

chmod
Just like you aren’t allowed to make system files so we have to use sudo, it can also be opening and changing system files. Since we just created a system file, we have to state we are allowed to make changes. This command changes the permissions of a file -R Is the same recursive flag, applying the change to the folder contents as well. Permissions are well documented give it a search, there is the creator, in this case we used sudo so root/sudo is the owner, the group, and everyone. Each number relates to the amount of permission that each section gets. 777 can fix all permission problems but is generally a bad idea, an application could write malware to that folder and then run/execute it, and save what it logs about you there because everyone has permission to do anything there. Create your own lawless computer dystopia. Like sudo, use with caution.

Stakes couldn’t be lower than with a new PI, it’s almost impossible to cause actual harm. I’ve embraced part of any programming is doing something wrong, if you get a message ‘some command can not find x” then we know where that problem is and we move on to the next one.

3 Likes

Thanks again for your help @makerken!
Well, I know the basics of these commands, but I learn every day still…

In my previous post, I commented what happened after every step.
I got up to the above command, but there seems to be a problem: “No such file or directory”

Shall I just ignore this and continue from there?

1 Like

Great documentation.

Your config.json file is in /var/lib/homebridge/ maybe the empty sample at this point, but you could modify the command to get rid of the error:

sudo cp /var/lib/homebridge/config.json /var/homebridge/

and skip sudo cp -r ~/.homebridge/persist /var/lib/homebridge because that is only if you have existing device configurations in Homebridge already saved.
Without fixing error above, it would complain that it couldn’t find a config.json on launch, but you would have to create one anyway for this to work, https://github.com/krvarma/homebridge-particle
you would modify that sample.config.json to have your details and create your own using

 nano /var/homebridge/config.json

Without a bunch of checking, I don’t know what’s already done, doing it again won’t hurt like you found with cannot create directory ‘/var/lib/homebridge’: File exists. Getting there

1 Like

This didn’t work…

Skip 4-6, step 4 linked was sudo mkdir /var/homebridge and then copying the file there, but you already have it in /var/lib/homebridge/ the wiki notes it just doesn’t like a hidden folder e.g. .homebridge and you already told HOMEBRIDGE_OPTS=-U /var/lib/homebridge where to find it so this should work.
Step 7 would change from sudo chmod -R 0777 /var/homebridge to

sudo chmod -R 0777 /var/lib/homebridge

which you’ve already done :slight_smile:

1 Like

Thanks @makerken!
I will try to continue as soon as I can make some time…
:+1:

1 Like

Thanks for guiding me till here @makerken!
At first, Homebridge did not appear in the Home App on my iPhone, but after I restarted it, it appeared and paired with the PIN as given (031-45-154)
Then the three items from the example sketch appeared one by one.

Here’s a screenshot:

The sketch is running on the RPi, with “Particle-Pi” but that does not react as intended.
One of the actions I used is the “D7” led on the Pi: The green LED next to the red power led. It blinked very briefly every time that I switched it on using the home app, but basically it should stay lit…

No problem, tomorrow I will experiment with a Photon to see if it all works…

:clap::older_man:

1 Like

Just wanted to chime in to let you know there are homebridge GUIs out there that make it a lot easier to manage plug-ins and edit your config file. A quick google should show you a couple :slight_smile:

2 Likes

Thanks for the tip @Moors7 , Sounds very promising!
Did you test one yourself?

How about this one?

Again, I’ll have to learn a lot about installing those plugins…
I am running Homebridge on a RPi but for most of these plugins they talk about installing on OS-X…

:wave::sleeping:

1 Like

Looks like the same one I have :slight_smile: Installing it is just another NPM command :wink:

1 Like

Just installed it:

sudo npm install -g --unsafe-perm homebridge-config-ui-x
/usr/bin/homebridge-config-ui-x -> /usr/lib/node_modules/homebridge-config-ui-x/bin/standalone.js

> node-pty@0.7.4 install /usr/lib/node_modules/homebridge-config-ui-x/node_modules/node-pty
> node scripts/install.js

make: Entering directory '/usr/lib/node_modules/homebridge-config-ui-x/node_modules/node-pty/build'
  CXX(target) Release/obj.target/pty/src/unix/pty.o
../src/unix/pty.cc: In function ‘void pty_after_waitpid(uv_async_t*)’:
../src/unix/pty.cc:489:69: warning: ‘v8::Local<v8::Value> Nan::Callback::Call(v8::Local<v8::Object>, int, v8::Local<v8::Value>*) const’ is deprecated [-Wdeprecated-declarations]
   Nan::Callback(cb).Call(Nan::GetCurrentContext()->Global(), 2, argv);
                                                                     ^
In file included from ../src/unix/pty.cc:20:0:
../../nan/nan.h:1596:3: note: declared here
   Call(v8::Local<v8::Object> target
   ^~~~
  SOLINK_MODULE(target) Release/obj.target/pty.node
  COPY Release/pty.node
make: Leaving directory '/usr/lib/node_modules/homebridge-config-ui-x/node_modules/node-pty/build'

> node-pty@0.7.4 postinstall /usr/lib/node_modules/homebridge-config-ui-x/node_modules/node-pty
> node scripts/post-install.js

+ homebridge-config-ui-x@3.4.0
added 256 packages in 122.783s

But I can’t start it with http://localhost:8080

Have you added the relevant bits to your config file?

1 Like

Yes, I added it before the Particle platform:

    "platforms": [
        {
	"platform": "config",
      	"name": "Config",
      	"port": 8080,
      	"sudo": false,
        "platform": "Particle",
	"name": "Particle Devices",
	"access_token": "mytoken",
	"cloudurl": "https://api.spark.io/v1/devices/",
	"devices": [

As all lines end with a “,” I added a “,” after sudo": false as it wasn’t there…
This is all totally new ground for me and as I don’t know what I’m doing exactly, I must guess…